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Sheriff’s Recruits to Receive College Credits

College and Sheriff’s Office Sign Agreement that will Encourage Recruits to Attend College

Harford County, Md: In an agreement recently reached with officials of Harford Community College, Harford County Deputy Sheriff recruits will now receive credits towards a college degree upon completion of the Sheriff’s Office Police Academy.

President of Harford Community College, Dr. James LaCalle, and Sheriff R.Thomas Golding, signed the agreement on June 28th after several months of meetings to ensure the academy training met the requirements by which the college could assign credits. Lt. Christopher Swain, Director of Training for the Sheriff’s Office explained that police recruits attend 990 hours of classroom training during their 6-month full time training program during which time students must pass all tests with 80% proficiency. Additionally, Swain noted, the recruits are required to complete a 3-month field training practicum.

Sheriff Golding said he saw the potential of this program and wanted it to be an opportunity to recruit good people and create a way to further their college education. “We’re losing good applicants to law enforcement agencies who can offer the applicant options in their career paths we didn’t have,” Golding said. “And by offering our recruits this program we give them a chance to earn college credits and jump start their college education by earning those credits while in our academy, he added. “It’s a terrific incentive,” the Sheriff said, and, “One we hope will cause applicants to choose to work for the Sheriff’s Office.” The Sheriff also added that for those thinking of pursuing a college education but maybe didn’t have the time or money, that this program would take the pressure of that decision off their shoulders. “They’re attending our academy and receiving college credits at the same time, Golding said. We’re hiring good applicants, the recruits are receiving college credits that will enhance their law enforcement careers and the county benefits “I think it is a win-win situation,” the Sheriff said.

Lt. Swain said recruits would earn 29 total credits – 27 criminal justice credits and 2 physical education requirement credits. They can graduate with an Associate of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice or Legal Studies if they complete an additional 35 credit hours in courses, which include English, math and science electives. Recently graduated recruits can start classes this fall, he said.